Immodesty becomes her?

This is something that a number of my friends and acquaintances who have studied and worked hard to obtain their PhDs have had to work through…. is it “immodest” to claim the title Dr?

My advice to them has always been “you bloody well earned it. Use it. Stuff everyone who thinks it’s ‘weird’ for women and non-medical personnel to be Doctors.”

But the whole #ImmodestWomen thing blew up on Twitter and reminded everyone that all too many people, men and women with massive internalised misogyny, are not comfortable with women expressing their qualifications and expertise in the form of using their proper title of Dr.

Common tweets to this hashtag were things like airlines refusing to accept that Dr was gender neutral, and refusing to let a woman board a plane booked for Dr So and So, as they were expecting a man. Or the all too frequent “Dr and Mrs X” that never gets changed even when the couple have made it very clear that it is Dr and Mr X over and over again (or even more shocking for traditionalist…. Dr A and Mr B)

I want to do a PhD. And if I complete it, you can be damn sure I will be calling myself Dr. You get that degree, you’ve earned that title. It’s not immodest. It’s just a fact – if you have completed a doctorate, you are a doctor.

language: a feminist guide

When the Toronto Globe & Mail announced that in future only medical doctors would be accorded the title ‘Dr’, it probably wasn’t expecting to cause a stir. But then a historian with a Ph.D objected:

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This tweet provoked an avalanche of criticism–directed not to the Globe & Mail‘s new style-rule, but to the arrogance and conceit of Fern Riddell. And as she later told the BBC, she couldn’t help noticing that her critics were mostly men. A lot of men seemed to be outraged by a woman claiming the status of an expert and expecting others to acknowledge her as such. ‘Humility Dr Riddell’, tweeted one. ‘There’s no Ph.D for that’.

But why should women humble themselves when other people are there to do it for them? As I explained in an earlier post, the treatment of women in the workplace is demonstrably affected by a ‘gender…

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Reblog – Gender equity in rural areas

Quite an old reblog – oops. Found this in my unpublished drafts.

But I remember at the time reading this and thinking “Yeah, I remember this from growing up in a regional area and then living in a rural area as a young lawyer.”

Women in the bush do it tough. There is so much ingrained misogyny in rural societies. It has to change.

By Caitlin McInnis The 62nd session of Commission on the Status of Women will take place in March 2018. The Australian government will be present at the session and recently took submissions from experts and the public as to what it should prioritise and advocate for when attending the session. The Castan Centre’s Acting Director […]

via Rural women and girls deserve gender equality too — Castan Centre for Human Rights Law

Personality disorders and the self-fulfilling prophecy – why staff attitudes really matter

Some great observations and research here.

Dan Warrender's Mental Health Blogma

The room sighs as yet another person diagnosed with a personality disorder is admitted to the busy hospital ward, as a health service with limited resources and a skeleton staff (yet ever increasing expectations from an insatiable society) wheezes through another day. Unbeknownst to the staff team however, their sigh has already set the tone for what is to follow. The expectations are often of a ‘difficult’ patient, perhaps influenced by the memory of previous challenging experiences, or the unwelcome diagnostic baggage and stigma which accompanies people with these controversial labels. Negative attitudes have commonly seen people described as manipulative and attention seeking, with emotional dysregulation and impulsivity often unhelpfully dismissed as “just behaviour”. There is no doubt that working with people with diagnoses of personality disorders in significant distress can be extremely challenging, with self-harm and suicidality a common and understandable precursor to staff distress, as they undertake the…

View original post 956 more words

Reblog – Gender equity in rural areas

By Caitlin McInnis The 62nd session of Commission on the Status of Women will take place in March 2018. The Australian government will be present at the session and recently took submissions from experts and the public as to what it should prioritise and advocate for when attending the session. The Castan Centre’s Acting Director […]

via Rural women and girls deserve gender equality too — Castan Centre for Human Rights Law

Euphemisms for Disability are Infantalizing

This is a great blog piece.

crippledscholar

Labels Image Description: a hand places disability label cards onto illustrations of children. Still taken from this youtube video

I have written about the importance of language as it relates to disability before. To oppose the idea that clear language should be avoided in favour of what can best be described as pretending difference doesn’t exist to opposing the replacement of clear language with euphemisms.

Euphemisms are rampant in disability discourse. There is this misguided idea that disability must be softened and made palatable.

This comes from general assumptions that the word disabled is negative and shouldn’t be used to describe people and from watching words that relate to disability be adopted by society as insults.

The best example of this can be seen in the evolution of language around intellectual disability. In the early, to mid-20th-century people began to realize that language utilized to describe intellectual disability had been…

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Letter to my (often feminist) friends who are concerned about those in “prostitution” and think that criminalizing those who pay for sex really can’t be such a bad idea.

This is good.

Feminist Ire

Guest post by Dr Susann Huschke

I write this with you in mind, those friends of mine who are generally open-minded, critical, progressive leftists. We agree on a lot of things – like, that capitalism is a problem, that Theresa May needs to go, and of course Trump, too, and that gender equality continues to be worth fighting for.

But when it comes to “prostitution” – that is, the selling and buying of sexual services – you are not so sure about my views. You have heard me argue that criminalizing those who pay for sex is a bad idea, but perhaps I have not done a good enough job explaining why that is. I believe it would be fair to sum up your position as follows: “We want to live in a society where women do not sell sex to men. And to get there, we think that it…

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Marriage equality – vote yes, vote now!

Reblogged from the Castan Centre.

This survey is a ridiculous waste of money and an offensively bad way to determine issues of policy, but the question is simple:

Should the law be changed to allow same-sex marriage?

That’s it. It is not about free speech or parenting or religious freedom or boys wearing dresses (which is actually not a bad thing…)

ooe5x6s

 

It’s just about whether Australian law should be equal and non-discriminatory. That’s all.

So vote yes, post your vote as soon as you get it, and remember this whole exercise in unleashing discrimination, bigotry and public expenditure wastefulness when we next have to vote for the government…

 

By Caitlin McInnis The marriage equality survey is now under way, and lots of Australians are showing their support for equal love. If you want to stay inspired on a daily basis, there are many things you can do, including following us on Facebook and Twitter, where we’ll be making the “YES” case every day. […]

via 5 things you need to know about voting in the marriage equality survey — Castan Centre for Human Rights Law